Dating colonial pipes

31-Dec-2019 11:16 by 9 Comments

Dating colonial pipes - updating speakers in silverado

For this cataloguing system, we suggest using Oswalds (19-42, figure 3G and 4G) Simplified General Typology for attempting to type pipe bowls that are complete enough to match the forms he provides.

dating colonial pipes-87

It is a small fragment of the upper wall and rim of the bowl mouth. The fragment incorporates a design motif consisting of upturned flames (that would have originated lower on the bowl), and a decorative band around the rim. Because the fragment is small, there is some ambiguity in the type.

Because most historical archaeologists can locate a copy of Nol Humes Guide to Artifacts of Colonial America (192, figure 97) within arms reach, this is the most frequently used though admittedly simplified bowl typology.

We ask that if you have a nearly complete bowl from which a type can be determined, to use the Oswald 1975 typology, but there is also a field to record reference to another typology, should you prefer. The Archaeology of the Clay Tobacco Pipe, edited by Peter Davey, BAR International Series, 13 volumes 1979-1994.

There is little doubt that the earliest pipes came from England.

The Spanish had observed the Indians off Florida’s coastline smoking cigar-like rolled tobacco leaves in 1493 and had eventually adapted that form of smoking for themselves.

Clay pipes have a long history dating back to the Native Americans of pre-colonial North America.

Simple clay tobacco pipes were introduced to the British when Sir Walter Raleigh began returning from his voyages to what we now call Virginia with tobacco from The New World.

These, no doubt served as a model for later pipe development. (see Walker, TD pipes, Bulletin of Archaeological Society of Virginia, Vol.

By 1558 tobacco smoking had been introduced to Europe.

However, the English working-class disagreed and took to the habit of smoking tobacco from a pipe almost immediately.

Crops of tobacco were planted up and down the English countryside and promptly burned by King James the First.

The kaolin tobacco pipe is one of the most useful artifacts that might be encountered at historical archaeological sites, for their short use-life and easily recognizable stylistic evolution provide valuable dating cues (Nol Hume 1969; Oswald 1951).

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